Longleaf Review: Now Seeking Submissions

Written by Ella Peary

A new online journal, Longleaf Review, just released their first publication of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. They take their name and inspiration from Zora Neale Hurston’s work gathering the stories of the women and men who lived and worked in the longleaf pine forests of Florida in the 1930’s. The turpentine camps of the longleaf forests were home to often-overworked and marginalized people who shared portraits of their humanity through stories and songs. Each individual had a story of their own, the heart of which—both glad and sorrowful—we can all find within ourselves. Longleaf Review seeks to showcase such stories—and the fact that we all have them—stories that affirm our humanity and help us to perceive our everyday life as an inspiration.

Right now, Longleaf Review is seeking submissions for their second issue. They accept submissions year-round, and publish on a rolling basis. They like to give each submission careful attention, so submitting authors can expect a response within four to twelve weeks.

Poets may submit up to five poems. Longleaf Review is looking for poems that echo long after they are read, that employ unique language and vivid imagery to create a strong emotional imprint. Authors of short fiction may submit stories of 1,500 to 5,000 words. They like engaging fiction that demonstrates skillful character development and unexpected use of language. They also like anything weird. While they don’t accept genre fiction, they do accept experimental work. Authors of flash fiction may submit shorts of 300 to 500 words. These must be complete pieces, not excerpts from longer works. They are looking for stories driven by strong character and voice. Authors of creative nonfiction may submit essays of 1,500 to 3,000 words. They like pieces that explore the nuances of the great expedition we call human life, and they welcome experimental writing.

Authors may send one submission in each category at a time. At Longleaf Review, they read submissions blind, so no identifying information should appear on the work itself. To get a sense of what they’re looking for, you can read their first issue online, as well as the editor’s notes in the submission guidelines.

Longleaf Review accepts submissions online, but not via email or by post. They accept simultaneous submissions, but ask that authors immediately withdraw work published elsewhere. They do not accept previously published work.

If you would like to learn more or submit to Longleaf Review, please visit their website at http://longleafreview.com/submissions/.