Skyhorse Publishing: Open To Book Proposals

Written by Emily Harstone | March 19, 2014

Skyhorse Publishing is one of the largest small presses in the United States. They were founded in 2006.  Over the past couple of years they have started to acquire other small presses. Skyhorse started out focused on publishing non-fiction and that is still their primary interest. However they have imprints that are interested in publishing work in other genres that you can see on their site. This review is only focused on Skyhorse.

Skyhorse has published a number of well known best selling books within the non-fiction genre. They have wide distribution and you often see Skyhorse books on the shelves of Barnes & Nobles. The books range from serious research based non-fiction, to diet books, to books written by “celebrities”.

It is easy to sift through their back catalog to see if your book might fit. They do not require agents or previous publication experience in order to submit a proposal.

They are currently looking for proposals in the following categories: Sports, History, Humor, Adventure and Travel, Health and Fitness, House and Home, Business, Food and Wine, Pets, and Current Events. They are also interested in a number of sub categories so make sure to check their website.

They tried a strategy a couple of years ago of charging authors 100$ in order to get feedback within a few days. This strategy received a fair amount of negative attention for obvious reasons. They do not seem to be pursuing this strategy anymore, which is why we are reviewing them at all. They take around a month and a half to respond to proposals.

I will say that I would approach them or any of their imprints with extreme caution. They do seem to have distribution and I have read their books but they have a deeply mixed leaning towards negative reputation because of disorganization and alleged un-payment of authors. To learn more about it, read this thread here. We are actively monitoring this publisher and may update this review at any time to include new information.

When you send them a proposal it should consist of the following: A brief query letter, a one-to-two page synopsis, an annotated chapter outline, rudimentary market analysis (focusing on what might be your literary competition), a sample chapter or two, as well as a bio containing all previous publishing credits. That last portion is why you should submit to literary journals and magazines. Even if you are not being published in the same genre at all, any publishing experience really makes a difference.

They accept all submissions through email. If you are interested in learning more or submitting please visit their website here.