5 Literary Markets for the Triple Threat

Written by Tammy Ruggles | October 10, 2013

Slide31If you’re a writer looking to be published by a literary journal, there are many publications that will give your non-fiction, fiction, and poetry consideration. For example, Glimmer Train and Ploughshares.

But what if you do more than write? What if you are also an illustrator and photographer?

Let’s say you took a photo or drew a picture of a mother robin feeding a worm to her baby in a nest. You can write an essay or poem to accompany the photo.

Having all three skills can multiply your opportunities for publication, winning competitions, and earning a little more income, so if this kind of venture sounds interesting to you, here are 5 literary publications that accept submissions in all three areas:

1. Able Muse. Besides publishing prose, poetry, essays, art, and photography, they publish featured writer/artist interviews and reviews. They work with new and seasoned writers and artists, and take submissions any time of the year. You can learn more at their website here: ablemuse.com

2. AGNI. Founded by Antioch College in the early 70’s, this literary journal prides itself on publishing alternative writing, art, and photography that says something about the culture in which we live. Their online presence is a supplement to their print edition. They pay $10 per page for prose, $20 per page of poetry. You can learn more at their website here: agnimagazine.org

3. The Fertile Source. Sometimes a literary magazine is specialized, and this is great for the writer/artist/photographer who has work that only fits a niche market, like this one, that publishes material on fertility-related issues like conception, birth, and adoption. They pay $50 per essay that is accepted for their anthologies, published by Catalyst Book Press.You can learn more at their website here: fertilesource.com

4. Diverse Voices Quarterly. A journal that has something for everyone.  They don’t pay, but sometimes having your work in a publication that stands for a social idea you support (like diversity) is more important. They hold readings four times a year and are open to reading a variety of subject matter, from essays to poetry. You can learn more at their website here: diversevoicesquarterly.com

5. Meat for Tea. This is a literary journal that promotes art, writing, and photography. They hold reading periods four times a year. Because they aren’t affiliated with a university or other educational institution, they are willing to publish more controversial or experimental material. They do a lot of promotion for their publication, including video and print. You can learn more at their website here: meatfortea.com

One thing to remember is that some literary journals have been around for decades, while others have just started. This has no bearing on whether they pay for material. Some of the more established don’t pay at all. It’s the prestige and the credit that’s attractive. Some of the newer ones pay very well, and are open to new writers. You’ll find some publications on the web, some in print, and some in both. Pay varies, so it’s a good idea to review the writer’s guidelines before querying.

Also, most literary publications today use an online submission form called Submittable. It makes things a little easier for publishers and writers to track submissions.

So the next time you sit down to query, keep in mind those publications that are open to considering all of the creativity you do. The key is to not limit the possibilities that await.

Bio: Tammy Ruggles is a legally blind freelance writer, artist, and photographer based in Kentucky. Her publishing credits include Disney’s Family Fun Magazine, American Profile, Spirituality & Health, and many more. Her first paperback book, Peace, was published in 2005 by Clear Light Books. You can see her art at http://tammyruggles.deviantart.com/gallery/